Rescuing the

American Chestnut

Our mission is to return the iconic American chestnut to its native range.

Our vision is a robust eastern forest returned to its splendor.

Chestnut Chat Series

Growing Chestnuts: Best Practices for Planting and Maintaining American Chestnut Trees

Join us on April 19, 2024, from 11:30AM – 1:00PM (EPT), for the next LIVE Chestnut Chat. Ready to get your hands dirty? Let’s talk about growing chestnuts! In this episode, we will cover all the basics of planting, growing, and maintaining American chestnut trees. TACF staff and expert volunteers will talk about how to plant chestnuts from seed and from seedlings, including bareroot and containerized seedlings, as well as considerations for planting in the spring versus the fall. Bring your questions and don’t miss this Chestnut Chat that is sure to become an instant classic.

Ciera Wilbur planting an American chestnut seedling

Science Strategies

Breeding, Biotechnology, and Biocontrol
United for Restoration

The American Chestnut Foundation takes a holistic approach toward chestnut restoration, utilizing a three-pronged research strategy known as 3BUR (Breeding, Biotechnology, and Biocontrol United for Restoration). These research tracks are meant to be integrated through collaborations that are mutually beneficial, so we can explore all avenues to reach the common goal of saving and restoring this species as quickly as possible.

Support Our Research

How to identify an American chestnut tree

Learn how to identify American chestnuts and send us a sample for identification.

Support The Restoration

How to receive seeds & seedlings

Learn how to get American chestnut seeds and seedlings from TACF.

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TACF'S documentary CLEAR DAY THUNDER: Rescuing the American Chestnut has received another award, and isn't it cool looking?

TACF was honored to learn that the film was recently selected as the winner in the Best Environmental Film category at the Lookout Wild Film Festival in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

The Lookout Wild Film Festival has been bringing together outdoor adventure and conservation films from around the world for more than ten years. This annual event took place January 11-14, 2024 and showcased more than 60 films.

If you'd like to schedule your own showing of Clear Day Thunder, visit www.rescuingtheamericanchestnut.com/
... See MoreSee Less

TACFS documentary CLEAR DAY THUNDER: Rescuing the American Chestnut has received another award, and isnt it cool looking? 

TACF was honored to learn that the film was recently selected as the winner in the Best Environmental Film category at the Lookout Wild Film Festival in Chattanooga, Tennessee. 

The Lookout Wild Film Festival has been bringing together outdoor adventure and conservation films from around the world for more than ten years. This annual event took place January 11-14, 2024 and showcased more than 60 films. 

If youd like to schedule your own showing of Clear Day Thunder, visit https://www.rescuingtheamericanchestnut.com/

1 CommentComment on Facebook

Shouldn’t TACF be concentrating on restoring the American chestnut not on making a movie. Is that really the best use of funds?

Join us on April 19, 2024, from 11:30AM – 1:00PM (EDT), for the next LIVE Chestnut Chat, where we'll talk all about growing chestnuts!

In this episode, we will cover all the basics of planting, growing, and maintaining American chestnut trees. TACF staff and expert volunteers will talk about how to plant chestnuts from seed and from seedlings, including bareroot and containerized seedlings, as well as considerations for planting in the spring versus the fall. Bring your questions and don’t miss this Chestnut Chat that is sure to become an instant classic.

Visit the link to save your spot! tacf.org/event/chestnut-chat-growing-chestnuts/
... See MoreSee Less

Join us on April 19, 2024, from 11:30AM – 1:00PM (EDT), for the next LIVE Chestnut Chat, where well talk all about growing chestnuts!

In this episode, we will cover all the basics of planting, growing, and maintaining American chestnut trees. TACF staff and expert volunteers will talk about how to plant chestnuts from seed and from seedlings, including bareroot and containerized seedlings, as well as considerations for planting in the spring versus the fall. Bring your questions and don’t miss this Chestnut Chat that is sure to become an instant classic.

Visit the link to save your spot! https://tacf.org/event/chestnut-chat-growing-chestnuts/

To everyone who feels the the same way, we see you ✨ 🌳 💚 ... See MoreSee Less

To everyone who feels the the same way, we see you ✨ 🌳 💚

2 CommentsComment on Facebook

I fear for the earth. She’s losing her battle. Tree cutters and lawn services loud and devasting . All the time.😭

Definitely true

Everybody loves to eat American chestnuts. Voles enjoy the roots and bark, deer will nibble the leaves and twigs, and just about everybody wants to get their claws on the nuts (squirrels, blue jays, raccoons, turkeys, bears, etc.)

Planting American chestnuts is a great way to provide natural food for wildlife, but if they eat your planted seed before it sprouts, or mow down your seedling before it grows up enough to reproduce, then that severely limits the food your chestnut can supply!

There are a variety of ways you can protect a seed in the ground. Options include tree shelters (store-bought plastic tubes often with ventilation holes), homemade aluminum flashing tubes, or cylinders made of hardware cloth or wire fencing. Pick the shortest shelter that works for the plant eaters you have in your area. Be sure to Insert it 2-4 inches into the ground to protect from voles.

Learn more on our Growing Chestnuts page at tacf.org/growing-chestnuts/#caring-for-chestnuts
... See MoreSee Less

Everybody loves to eat American chestnuts. Voles enjoy the roots and bark, deer will nibble the leaves and twigs, and just about everybody wants to get their claws on the nuts (squirrels, blue jays, raccoons, turkeys, bears, etc.)

Planting American chestnuts is a great way to provide natural food for wildlife, but if they eat your planted seed before it sprouts, or mow down your seedling before it grows up enough to reproduce, then that severely limits the food your chestnut can supply!

There are a variety of ways you can protect a seed in the ground. Options include tree shelters (store-bought plastic tubes often with ventilation holes), homemade aluminum flashing tubes, or cylinders made of hardware cloth or wire fencing. Pick the shortest shelter that works for the plant eaters you have in your area. Be sure to Insert it 2-4 inches into the ground to protect from voles.

Learn more on our Growing Chestnuts page at https://tacf.org/growing-chestnuts/#caring-for-chestnuts

OK don't cheat and look at the answer until you decide. Which is a horse chestnut and which is an American chestnut?

Got it?

Is that your final answer?

The answer is:
The top right is an American chestnut and the bottom left is a horse chestnut!

If you're an American chestnut fan, then this might have been obvious to you. But you'd be surprised at how many articles we see in the media that are about American chestnuts and show a picture of a horse chestnut!

Why might that be? Well, when I search "chestnut" in google images, 2 of the first 10 are horse chestnuts (which aren't technically chestnuts) and when I search "chestnut leaf" it's even worse; 6 of the first 10 are horse chestnuts.

If you got trivia question one correct, it's time for the bonus round.

Where are horse chestnuts native to?

If you guessed the United States, sorry! Yes you can find them all around the US, but they are native to Eastern Europe!

To learn all about the differences between a horse chestnut and an American chestnut, check out this nice TACF fact sheet: tacf.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/American-v-Horse-1.pdf
... See MoreSee Less

OK dont cheat and look at the answer until you decide. Which is a horse chestnut and which is an American chestnut?

Got it?

Is that your final answer?

The answer is:
The top right is an American chestnut and the bottom left is a horse chestnut!

If youre an American chestnut fan, then this might have been obvious to you. But youd be surprised at how many articles we see in the media that are about American chestnuts and show a picture of a horse chestnut!

Why might that be? Well, when I search chestnut in google images, 2 of the first 10 are horse chestnuts (which arent technically chestnuts) and when I search chestnut leaf its even worse; 6 of the first 10 are horse chestnuts.

If you got trivia question one correct, its time for the bonus round.

Where are horse chestnuts native to?

If you guessed the United States, sorry! Yes you can find them all around the US, but they are native to Eastern Europe!

To learn all about the differences between a horse chestnut and an American chestnut, check out this nice TACF fact sheet: https://tacf.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/American-v-Horse-1.pdf

10 CommentsComment on Facebook

On left are the horsechestnuts. Top pic are American Chestnuts

There was a horse chestnut tree in my grandmother's yard that lasted into th 1980s, maybe. (lower left)

We had a Horse Chestnut tree (left bottom) in our backyard in PA.

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Upcoming Events

10:00AM - 2:00PM

Meeting will be online The American Chestnut Foundation is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting. Join Zoom Meeting https://us02web.zoom.us/j/82427954398 Meeting ID: 824 2795 4398 Passcode: 1904 Agenda coming soon […]

10:00AM - 4:00PM

The VA Department of Forestry and VATACF will be planting 300 bareroot seedlings at Lesesne State Forest on Monday, April 15th. Planting will begin at 10 am and last until […]

7:00PM - 8:00PM

Jack Swatt stands next to a wild American chestnut tree in Seymour, CT CT-TACF Presentation on the Restoration of The American Chestnut sponsored by The Heritage Land Trust Join Jack […]