Indiana News

Pulling Chestnut seedlings to be used for grafting

On March 4, 2022 Caleb Kell, who works on chestnut breeding at Purdue’s Hardwood Tree Improvement and Regeneration Center, pulled and packaged American chestnut seedlings at the Indiana DNR state tree nursery at Vallonia Indiana. These robust seedlings are one year old. Caleb was assisted by chapter volunteer Sharon Kotnik as well as workers from the nursery.

Many of these seedlings will be used as rootstock. The stem will be cut off a short way above the roots and scion wood will be grafted onto the rootstock. Scion wood is a shoot or twig cut from the upper branches of an existing full grown tree, in this case a long term surviving American chestnut tree.

Often grafting is the only way an old chestnut found in the forest can be preserved. Chestnut trees that are still alive after many years of growing in the wild and surviving the blight are a very valuable genetic resource and their genetics or “germplasm” needs to be preserved for breeding ever more blight resistant chestnuts. The grafted trees are grown in our germplasm conservation orchard, GCO. The pollen and nuts from our GCOs are used to breed new backcross chestnuts and also sent to locations where TACF is doing research on producing transgenic chestnut trees using the oxalate oxidase gene.

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Meet Venus and Neptune! These kittens are not even a year old yet, which might explain their affinity for getting into boxes and paper bags. They are great at helping their loving caretaker, TACF's Nursery Manager at Meadowview Research Farms, Ciera manage pests.

Ciera grew up in California where they gained love and respect for the natural world. Growing up in the California foothills, a story about American chestnut breeding inspired them to pursue their passion for the environment as a career!
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Meet Venus and Neptune! These kittens are not even a year old yet, which might explain their affinity for getting into boxes and paper bags. They are great at helping their loving caretaker, TACFs Nursery Manager at Meadowview Research Farms, Ciera manage pests. 

Ciera grew up in California where they gained love and respect for the natural world. Growing up in the California foothills, a story about American chestnut breeding inspired them to pursue their passion for the environment as a career!Image attachmentImage attachment

Without this "biological diversity" there would be no terrestrial life on earth, which would mean no chestnuts. And how sad would that be? ... See MoreSee Less

Without this biological diversity there would be no terrestrial life on earth, which would mean no chestnuts. And how sad would that be?

2 CommentsComment on Facebook

Diversity in all things =stability

give me a break...

Where did the names Cassie & Denny come from? Mommy chestnut and Daddy chestnut picked them out of a baby names book. Or you can find out the true origin story by watching this episode. ... See MoreSee Less

Georgia friends, join the GA Chapter of TACF for a screening of our documentary Clear Day Thunder: Rescuing the American Chestnut.

This event takes places Thursday, May 30 at 7:00PM at the historic DeSoto Theatre in Rome, GA. Visit tacf.org/event/ga-rome-international-film-festivals-screening-of-clear-day-thunder/ for more details or to get free tickets to this screening.
... See MoreSee Less

Georgia friends, join the GA Chapter of TACF for a screening of our documentary Clear Day Thunder: Rescuing the American Chestnut. 

This event takes places Thursday, May 30 at 7:00PM at the historic DeSoto Theatre in Rome, GA. Visit https://tacf.org/event/ga-rome-international-film-festivals-screening-of-clear-day-thunder/ for more details or to get free tickets to this screening.

1 CommentComment on Facebook

Gay Ziska:)

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