New York Chapter

How You Can Help

Become a Member:

Become a NY-TACF member by joining The American Chestnut Foundation and choosing “New York” as your State Chapter Membership. When you join, $15.00 of your donation will go directly to the chapter. You can also renew your NY-TACF membership.

If you would like to join by mail, please send your check, along with a note stating “New York” as your preferred chapter, to:

The American Chestnut Foundation
50 North Merrimon Avenue, Suite 115
Asheville, NC 28804

Donate:

Donate here to assist with the SUNY ESF Biotechnology Program. Donations are tax-deductible to the full extent allowed by law. You can also donate directly on ESF’s webpage.

If you would like to donate by mail, please send your check made out to NY-TACF to:

NY-TACF C/O Treasurer Fran Nichols
302 Bateman Road
Laurens, NY 13796

Volunteer:

Events include spring planting of nuts and seedlings, and fall harvesting of burs. Please contact your local District Director for events in your area. Nut exchange takes place on Friday night at the Annual Meeting.

Find Trees:

We encourage people to look for wild American Chestnut trees. If you find one, you can log the information into TreeSnap on your smartphone and send a sample in for verification (information here). Note the exact location and measure diameter of tree trunk at breast height, and estimate height of tree. Look for signs of blight and sprouts at the base of the tree. After confirmation, gather nuts for the gene pool, keeping the true American Chestnut stock available for the future.

In addition, the New York Chapter is searching for large surviving American chestnut trees in New York State to be “Mother trees” for restoration. In an effort to introduce more wild American chestnut trees into the transgenic breeding program, the chapter is now offering a reward for American chestnut trees found growing in the wild. For more information, contact the chapter president, Allen Nichols.

New York Chapter Menu

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Where did the names Cassie & Denny come from? Mommy chestnut and Daddy chestnut picked them out of a baby names book. Or you can find out the true origin story by watching this episode. ... See MoreSee Less

Georgia friends, join the GA Chapter of TACF for a screening of our documentary Clear Day Thunder: Rescuing the American Chestnut.

This event takes places Thursday, May 30 at 7:00PM at the historic DeSoto Theatre in Rome, GA. Visit tacf.org/event/ga-rome-international-film-festivals-screening-of-clear-day-thunder/ for more details or to get free tickets to this screening.
... See MoreSee Less

Georgia friends, join the GA Chapter of TACF for a screening of our documentary Clear Day Thunder: Rescuing the American Chestnut. 

This event takes places Thursday, May 30 at 7:00PM at the historic DeSoto Theatre in Rome, GA. Visit https://tacf.org/event/ga-rome-international-film-festivals-screening-of-clear-day-thunder/ for more details or to get free tickets to this screening.

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Gay Ziska:)

Don't worry, if you were already following us before, you still are! This new handle allows us to stay consistent across platforms. ... See MoreSee Less

Dont worry, if you were already following us before, you still are! This new handle allows us to stay consistent across platforms.

Denny's are still hanging on, but Cassie has already dropped them. What could it be? Learn a bit of tree anatomy and discover a new trick to identify chestnut tree species in this week's Cassie & Denny.

And be sure to tune in next week when we explain the origin of the names Cassie & Denny!
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