Ohio Chapter

Research

Ohio Chapter TACF Small Grants Program

Grants are available to assist members with active restoration projects within, outreach activities, and scholarly research conducted within the State of Ohio. Click here for Rules, Responsibilities, and Proposal Guidelines.

The Ohio Chapter of American Chestnut Foundation (OH-TACF) was founded largely through the efforts of Ohio scientists and as such has a strong interest in breeding, restoration ecology, and reclamation biology.

Because of the large amount of the land-base disturbed through surface mining in unglaciated Ohio, the chapter has a special devotion towards combining mineland reclamation and chestnut restoration.

Through research funded by the USDI Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement, we have explored various ways to regenerate chestnut on previously disturbed minelands. Many post SMCRA lands in Ohio exist has monocultures of non-native species (orchard grass, autumn olive, Lespedeza, etc.) on heavily compacted soils. Natural succession to a hardwood forest community type is virtually arrested and unlikely to occur in normal time frames.

Through much trial and error, we have developed a fairly successful method of planting that results in high survival of bare root seedling plantings. A 48-inch mesh cage protects from deer browsing, a weed mat reduces competition with herbs, gravel reduces mole and vole bark stripping, fertilizer and TerraSorb enhance establishment and promote survival. This method is moderately expensive ($10/seedling) and requires 20 minutes to establish; however, survival is usually greater than 90%. We advocate this method for high quality hybrid seedlings where high survival is desired.

We have successfully used heavy equipment to loosen compacted soils and increase aeration, infiltration, and permeability. We have used a 36-inch ripping bar on a D-6 sized dozer and followed this with a 16-inch surface plow and disk on a large tractor. The above planting method is used after this type of site prep yielding excellent results.

In addition to the studies described above, the Ohio Chapter is currently beginning a program to find surviving chestnuts in Ohio forests, establish demonstration plantings, creating breeding orchards, and advancing various forms of restoration efforts utilizing American chestnut. We welcome all interested parties! Our mission is to keep the American chestnut alive in Ohio for future generations.

If you have any questions regarding current or planned research on American chestnut in Ohio, please contact Brian C. McCarthy at Ohio University.

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Have you been wondering if you can get seeds or seedlings shipped to you? This chart will tell you!

The chance to receive seeds or seedlings from TACF's national office has passed for 2024, but if you'd like the chance to get some in 2025, visit tacf.org/american-chestnut-seeds-and-seedlings/ for more details.

Keep in mind, If you join your state chapter then you may be able to get seeds or seedlings at other times of the year, so go volunteer and see what your chapter has to offer!
... See MoreSee Less

Have you been wondering if you can get seeds or seedlings shipped to you? This chart will tell you! 

The chance to receive seeds or seedlings from TACFs national office has passed for 2024, but if youd like the chance to get some in 2025, visit https://tacf.org/american-chestnut-seeds-and-seedlings/ for more details.
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Keep in mind, If you join your state chapter then you may be able to get seeds or seedlings at other times of the year, so go volunteer and see what your chapter has to offer!

11 CommentsComment on Facebook

What about canada

Is there a reason the west coast does qualify? The chat doesn’t say why.

It looks the original native range in Canada may only have been around London/niagara.

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Ready for a downer? It's time to talk about blight.

The American chestnut used to be one of the dominant trees in the eastern forests, until a non-native fungus was introduced from Asia in the late 1800's and wiped them out. Today there are almost no mature American chestnut trees left.

But the question is, do our American chestnut friends Cassie & Denny have blight? Let's find out.
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2 CommentsComment on Facebook

That's not a bummer if she got knocked back due to other natural causes! That's actually great news if neither is showing blight!!

Love the optimism!

Lola came to Jules's family as a wee puppy about 10 Christmases ago from Brother Wolf, a rescue mission in Asheville. She was delivered to her then 7-year-old daughter, and Jules will never forget the look on her daughter's face when Lola popped her head out from where she was hidden in a small tote bag.

Though originally from eastern Tennessee, Jules, the director of communications at TACF, moved to Asheville in 2010 from Cambridge, Massachusetts, where she was the Communications Associate at Episcopal Divinity School. Prior to accepting the job at TACF, she was the Webmaster and Communications Specialist at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Asheville. Before switching career paths, Jules worked as a videographer and editor in the television news industry.
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Lola came to Juless family as a wee puppy about 10 Christmases ago from Brother Wolf, a rescue mission in Asheville. She was delivered to her then 7-year-old daughter, and Jules will never forget the look on her daughters face when Lola popped her head out from where she was hidden in a small tote bag.

Though originally from eastern Tennessee, Jules, the director of communications at TACF, moved to Asheville in 2010 from Cambridge, Massachusetts, where she was the Communications Associate at Episcopal Divinity School. Prior to accepting the job at TACF, she was the Webmaster and Communications Specialist at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Asheville. Before switching career paths, Jules worked as a videographer and editor in the television news industry.Image attachment

1 CommentComment on Facebook

Love this post. Jules is a very special person!

It's here!! Now you don't have to wait for a public showing near you, you can watch it from the comfort of your home instead.
To watch go to www.cleardaythunder.film/ , pay the $10.00 fee, roast up some chestnuts, and enjoy!
... See MoreSee Less

Its here!! Now you dont have to wait for a public showing near you, you can watch it from the comfort of your home instead. 
To watch go to https://www.cleardaythunder.film/ , pay the $10.00 fee, roast up some chestnuts, and enjoy!

On Friday, June 7th, tree experts from Montgomery County Parks helped the Maryland Chapter obtain pollen from an unusually tall timber-type Chinese chestnut growing along the Rock Creek hiking trail near Jones Mill Road in Chevy Chase. The tree, standing 75-80 feet tall, competes with native trees and flowers in the canopy. The Maryland Chapter hopes to use this pollen on American chestnuts in their orchards, which should result in Chinese-American hybrids with significant resistance to chestnut blight and phytophthora root rot, but without the short branch growth habit typical of Chinese chestnuts. We are grateful to Montgomery County Parks for their help and impressive climbing skills. We hope to continue working together to generate useful breeding material from this remarkable tree. ... See MoreSee Less

On Friday, June 7th, tree experts from Montgomery County Parks helped the Maryland Chapter obtain pollen from an unusually tall timber-type Chinese chestnut growing along the Rock Creek hiking trail near Jones Mill Road in Chevy Chase. The tree, standing 75-80 feet tall, competes with native trees and flowers in the canopy. The Maryland Chapter hopes to use this pollen on American chestnuts in their orchards, which should result in Chinese-American hybrids with significant resistance to chestnut blight and phytophthora root rot, but without the short branch growth habit typical of Chinese chestnuts. We are grateful to Montgomery County Parks for their help and impressive climbing skills. We hope to continue working together to generate useful breeding material from this remarkable tree.Image attachmentImage attachment+6Image attachment

4 CommentsComment on Facebook

The best way is to get involved with the Tennessee Chapter of The American Chestnut Foundation!

Thank you for your efforts!

Where can I get chestnut trees to add to my woodlands located in NE Tennessee?

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