West Virginia Chapter

About Us

The West Virginia Chapter of The American Chestnut Foundation (WV-TACF) was established in 2009, the last of TACF’s 16 state chapters to be incorporated. Hybrid chestnut trees have been planted at 68 sites in 26 WV counties. We have initiated germplasm conservation orchards (pure American chestnut plantings) at seven sites in the state. Chapter members help support the mission of the national organization by planting hybrid chestnuts, conducting education, research, and outreach.

If you would like to participate in this group please join us. We include people from all areas that have an interest in restoring this magnificent tree to our forests. When you join The American Chestnut Foundation, a portion of your dues will be shared with the WV-TACF Chapter.

To learn more about who we are and what we do, read our monthly newsletter!

Chestnut Identification

Distinguishing American from Chinese and European Chestnut

Sometimes, individuals who come across a tall chestnut tree in a forest setting, assume it must be an American chestnut.  This is not always the case.  In forest settings, Chinese chestnut, like its American cousin, also can grown straight and tall.  Leaf shape, leaf hairs and twig color are good characteristics to distinguish American from Chinese chestnut.  American chestnut leaves are generally long and slender with a “V” at the leaf base.  Chinese chestnuts have a wider leaf and they are often shiny.  Chinese chestnut leaves have a “U” shape at the leaf base.  Most striking are the hairs on the under-surface of Chinese chestnut leaves.  American chestnut leaves have no hairs.  Chinese twigs, generally brown in color, also have hairs.  American twigs, generally exhibit a reddish color, and like the leaves, the twigs have no hairs.  Buds are another characteristic–American buds are pointed compared to rounded Chinese buds.

In some areas of the eastern U.S., European chestnut trees can be found.  In comparison, European twigs are much stouter than either American or Chinese chestnut.  Buds on a European are often large and green in early spring, turning darker by mid-summer.  Buds are green in the spring, turning dark in summer.

Click here for more chestnut leaf and tree identification information.

WV Chapter Board of Directors

President

Mark Double, Morgantown

Vice President

Jerry Legg, Elkview

Secretary

Jeff Kochenderfer, Petersburg

Treasurer

Sam Muncy, Philippi

Board Members

Dr. Lewis Cook, Fayetteville

Linda Coyle, Keyser

Dr. Joe Golden, Beckley

Jimmy Jenkins, Flatwoods

Carla Kesling, Bridgeport

Dr. Don Kines, Davis

Dr. Brian Perkins, Elkins

Charles Sypolt, Glenville

Dr. Melissa Thomas-Van Gundy, Elkins

West Virginia Chapter Menu

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Have you been wondering if you can get seeds or seedlings shipped to you? This chart will tell you!

The chance to receive seeds or seedlings from TACF's national office has passed for 2024, but if you'd like the chance to get some in 2025, visit tacf.org/american-chestnut-seeds-and-seedlings/ for more details.

Keep in mind, If you join your state chapter then you may be able to get seeds or seedlings at other times of the year, so go volunteer and see what your chapter has to offer!
... See MoreSee Less

Have you been wondering if you can get seeds or seedlings shipped to you? This chart will tell you! 

The chance to receive seeds or seedlings from TACFs national office has passed for 2024, but if youd like the chance to get some in 2025, visit https://tacf.org/american-chestnut-seeds-and-seedlings/ for more details.
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Keep in mind, If you join your state chapter then you may be able to get seeds or seedlings at other times of the year, so go volunteer and see what your chapter has to offer!

11 CommentsComment on Facebook

What about canada

Is there a reason the west coast does qualify? The chat doesn’t say why.

It looks the original native range in Canada may only have been around London/niagara.

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Ready for a downer? It's time to talk about blight.

The American chestnut used to be one of the dominant trees in the eastern forests, until a non-native fungus was introduced from Asia in the late 1800's and wiped them out. Today there are almost no mature American chestnut trees left.

But the question is, do our American chestnut friends Cassie & Denny have blight? Let's find out.
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2 CommentsComment on Facebook

That's not a bummer if she got knocked back due to other natural causes! That's actually great news if neither is showing blight!!

Love the optimism!

Lola came to Jules's family as a wee puppy about 10 Christmases ago from Brother Wolf, a rescue mission in Asheville. She was delivered to her then 7-year-old daughter, and Jules will never forget the look on her daughter's face when Lola popped her head out from where she was hidden in a small tote bag.

Though originally from eastern Tennessee, Jules, the director of communications at TACF, moved to Asheville in 2010 from Cambridge, Massachusetts, where she was the Communications Associate at Episcopal Divinity School. Prior to accepting the job at TACF, she was the Webmaster and Communications Specialist at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Asheville. Before switching career paths, Jules worked as a videographer and editor in the television news industry.
... See MoreSee Less

Lola came to Juless family as a wee puppy about 10 Christmases ago from Brother Wolf, a rescue mission in Asheville. She was delivered to her then 7-year-old daughter, and Jules will never forget the look on her daughters face when Lola popped her head out from where she was hidden in a small tote bag.

Though originally from eastern Tennessee, Jules, the director of communications at TACF, moved to Asheville in 2010 from Cambridge, Massachusetts, where she was the Communications Associate at Episcopal Divinity School. Prior to accepting the job at TACF, she was the Webmaster and Communications Specialist at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Asheville. Before switching career paths, Jules worked as a videographer and editor in the television news industry.Image attachment

1 CommentComment on Facebook

Love this post. Jules is a very special person!

It's here!! Now you don't have to wait for a public showing near you, you can watch it from the comfort of your home instead.
To watch go to www.cleardaythunder.film/ , pay the $10.00 fee, roast up some chestnuts, and enjoy!
... See MoreSee Less

Its here!! Now you dont have to wait for a public showing near you, you can watch it from the comfort of your home instead. 
To watch go to https://www.cleardaythunder.film/ , pay the $10.00 fee, roast up some chestnuts, and enjoy!

On Friday, June 7th, tree experts from Montgomery County Parks helped the Maryland Chapter obtain pollen from an unusually tall timber-type Chinese chestnut growing along the Rock Creek hiking trail near Jones Mill Road in Chevy Chase. The tree, standing 75-80 feet tall, competes with native trees and flowers in the canopy. The Maryland Chapter hopes to use this pollen on American chestnuts in their orchards, which should result in Chinese-American hybrids with significant resistance to chestnut blight and phytophthora root rot, but without the short branch growth habit typical of Chinese chestnuts. We are grateful to Montgomery County Parks for their help and impressive climbing skills. We hope to continue working together to generate useful breeding material from this remarkable tree. ... See MoreSee Less

On Friday, June 7th, tree experts from Montgomery County Parks helped the Maryland Chapter obtain pollen from an unusually tall timber-type Chinese chestnut growing along the Rock Creek hiking trail near Jones Mill Road in Chevy Chase. The tree, standing 75-80 feet tall, competes with native trees and flowers in the canopy. The Maryland Chapter hopes to use this pollen on American chestnuts in their orchards, which should result in Chinese-American hybrids with significant resistance to chestnut blight and phytophthora root rot, but without the short branch growth habit typical of Chinese chestnuts. We are grateful to Montgomery County Parks for their help and impressive climbing skills. We hope to continue working together to generate useful breeding material from this remarkable tree.Image attachmentImage attachment+6Image attachment

4 CommentsComment on Facebook

The best way is to get involved with the Tennessee Chapter of The American Chestnut Foundation!

Thank you for your efforts!

Where can I get chestnut trees to add to my woodlands located in NE Tennessee?

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