West Virginia Chapter

About Us

The West Virginia Chapter of The American Chestnut Foundation (WV-TACF) was established in 2009, the last of TACF’s 16 state chapters to be incorporated. Hybrid chestnut trees have been planted at 68 sites in 26 WV counties. We have initiated germplasm conservation orchards (pure American chestnut plantings) at seven sites in the state. Chapter members help support the mission of the national organization by planting hybrid chestnuts, conducting education, research, and outreach.

If you would like to participate in this group please join us. We include people from all areas that have an interest in restoring this magnificent tree to our forests. When you join The American Chestnut Foundation, a portion of your dues will be shared with the WV-TACF Chapter.

To learn more about who we are and what we do, read our monthly newsletter!

Chestnut Identification

Distinguishing American from Chinese and European Chestnut

Sometimes, individuals who come across a tall chestnut tree in a forest setting, assume it must be an American chestnut.  This is not always the case.  In forest settings, Chinese chestnut, like its American cousin, also can grown straight and tall.  Leaf shape, leaf hairs and twig color are good characteristics to distinguish American from Chinese chestnut.  American chestnut leaves are generally long and slender with a “V” at the leaf base.  Chinese chestnuts have a wider leaf and they are often shiny.  Chinese chestnut leaves have a “U” shape at the leaf base.  Most striking are the hairs on the under-surface of Chinese chestnut leaves.  American chestnut leaves have no hairs.  Chinese twigs, generally brown in color, also have hairs.  American twigs, generally exhibit a reddish color, and like the leaves, the twigs have no hairs.  Buds are another characteristic–American buds are pointed compared to rounded Chinese buds.

In some areas of the eastern U.S., European chestnut trees can be found.  In comparison, European twigs are much stouter than either American or Chinese chestnut.  Buds on a European are often large and green in early spring, turning darker by mid-summer.  Buds are green in the spring, turning dark in summer.

Click here for more chestnut leaf and tree identification information.

WV Chapter Board of Directors

President

Mark Double, Morgantown

Vice President

Jerry Legg, Elkview

Secretary

Jeff Kochenderfer, Petersburg

Treasurer

Sam Muncy, Philippi

Board Members

Dr. Lewis Cook, Fayetteville

Linda Coyle, Keyser

Dr. Joe Golden, Beckley

Jimmy Jenkins, Flatwoods

Carla Kesling, Bridgeport

Dr. Don Kines, Davis

Dr. Brian Perkins, Elkins

Charles Sypolt, Glenville

Dr. Melissa Thomas-Van Gundy, Elkins

West Virginia Chapter Menu

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Pets of The American Chestnut Foundation: Episode 3

Charlie Renfield Sparkle, aka Charlie Chestnut or “Chichi,” is a certified HLI (Horrible Little Idiot) with over 6 months experience of bringing joy and chaos to the home of TACF’s Northern Regional Outreach Coordinator, Catherine Martini. He was brought home last fall along with the chestnut harvest and has been trying to bury himself in the forest ever since. Charlie is not a wild-type American chihuahua and hasn’t been genotyped yet, but phenotypically we believe he is a Pug-Chihuahua hybrid.
When not digging up various disgusting things in the yard, Charlie is most frequently attacking his siblings or snoring on Catherine’s lap while she checks her emails.

Matilda is the soul-dog and familiar of Catherine. She is a fearsome and powerful wrestler who only plays “Matilda wins.” Her favorite activities include sunning herself, going for long walks in the wilderness, protecting every baby (no matter what species – most recently, bunnies), and giving an amount of kisses way above the recommended daily allowance. Matilda prides herself on her ability to make anyone, even her dog siblings, give up their spot on the couch for her. And let’s face it, she really deserves that spot more than any of us do.

Moreau “Goose” Martini-Riley is a 5-year-old boxer dog who got the nickname of “Goose” because he is so silly. Goose is here for two reasons: to play, and to eat butter – and he’s not allowed to eat butter.
Goose only has one brain cell, which is heart-shaped, so he’s perfectly suited to his job of being the charismatic goof-ball who loves everyone. He enjoys making everyone he meets feel like the most important person in the world and will sneak in a sloppy kiss or two if you let him. Goose loves to help in the garden, mostly by digging holes, but he also loves to hurt in the garden, mostly by digging holes. Goose was born deaf, but he doesn’t know it – he knows sign commands and enjoys sleeping through his siblings’ barking parties.
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Join us on TODAY, April 19, 2024, from 11:30AM – 1:00PM (EDT), for the next LIVE Chestnut Chat, where we'll talk all about growing chestnuts!

In this episode, we will cover all the basics of planting, growing, and maintaining American chestnut trees. TACF staff and expert volunteers will talk about how to plant chestnuts from seed and from seedlings, including bareroot and containerized seedlings, as well as considerations for planting in the spring versus the fall. Bring your questions and don’t miss this Chestnut Chat that is sure to become an instant classic.

Visit the link to save your spot! tacf.org/event/chestnut-chat-growing-chestnuts/
... See MoreSee Less

Join us on TODAY, April 19, 2024, from 11:30AM – 1:00PM (EDT), for the next LIVE Chestnut Chat, where well talk all about growing chestnuts!

In this episode, we will cover all the basics of planting, growing, and maintaining American chestnut trees. TACF staff and expert volunteers will talk about how to plant chestnuts from seed and from seedlings, including bareroot and containerized seedlings, as well as considerations for planting in the spring versus the fall. Bring your questions and don’t miss this Chestnut Chat that is sure to become an instant classic.

Visit the link to save your spot! https://tacf.org/event/chestnut-chat-growing-chestnuts/

1 CommentComment on Facebook

Was this episode recorded? I was only able to follow along for a few minutes because I was at work. But, I'd love to see this again.

You can make a difference for people, for an ecosystem, and for a tree.

Join the movement to save the American chestnut by becoming a member of The American Chestnut Foundation today.

support.tacf.org/membership
... See MoreSee Less

You can make a difference for people, for an ecosystem, and for a tree.

Join the movement to save the American chestnut by becoming a member of The American Chestnut Foundation today.

https://support.tacf.org/membership

One year ago volunteers gathered at Pryor Orchard in Edneyville, NC and planted chestnuts seeds gathered on the Appalachian Trail by NC/SC Chapter member Jon Taylor, who also led a planting demonstration at the start of the event.

To see find out about volunteer and planting events in your neck of the woods, visit our events calendar at tacf.org/events/category/tacf/
... See MoreSee Less

One year ago volunteers gathered at Pryor Orchard in Edneyville, NC and planted chestnuts seeds gathered on the Appalachian Trail by NC/SC Chapter member Jon Taylor, who also led a planting demonstration at the start of the event.

To see find out about volunteer and planting events in your neck of the woods, visit our events calendar at https://tacf.org/events/category/tacf/

HAPPENING IN TWO DAYS!

The VA Department of Forestry and VATACF will be planting 300 bareroot seedlings at Lesesne State Forest on Monday, April 15th. Planting will begin at 10:00AM and last until we are finished (likely 4-6 hours depending on how many folks come out). Please come out and help us plant these trees in our effort to restore the American chestnut!

Please note that the terrain we are planting on has a lot of brush and debris, it is not easy to get around. If you have movement issues I recommend selecting another of our volunteer events. Bring water, lunch/snacks, bug spray or sunscreen if needed, and gardening gloves. We will have all the equipment required for planting.

Please visit the link for more information. tacf.org/event/planting-at-lesesne-state-forest/
... See MoreSee Less

HAPPENING IN TWO DAYS! 

The VA Department of Forestry and VATACF will be planting 300 bareroot seedlings at Lesesne State Forest on Monday, April 15th. Planting will begin at 10:00AM and last until we are finished (likely 4-6 hours depending on how many folks come out). Please come out and help us plant these trees in our effort to restore the American chestnut!

Please note that the terrain we are planting on has a lot of brush and debris, it is not easy to get around. If you have movement issues I recommend selecting another of our volunteer events. Bring water, lunch/snacks, bug spray or sunscreen if needed, and gardening gloves. We will have all the equipment required for planting.

Please visit the link for more information. https://tacf.org/event/planting-at-lesesne-state-forest/

1 CommentComment on Facebook

Guess no accountants will participate

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